TRICK OR TREAT! HERE’S HOW TO ADAPT YOUR HOME FOR CANDY-SEEKERS THIS HALLOWEEN If you’re participating in the spookiest holiday

Boo! This year has been quite the scare.

Like many holidays and celebrations in 2020, Halloween is sure to look different due to the COVID-19 pandemic. For those who plan on doling out candy for their neighborhood ghosts and goblins, consider these ideas for a safer way to accommodate trick-or-treaters.

Arrange candy outside

The CDC is recommending “one-way trick-or-treating” this year for those still partaking in Halloween. Rather than having children ring the doorbell, arrange candy outside in advance for curbside pick-up. This way, children can visit your house for treats in a contact-free manner.

Instead of the traditional candy bowl, consider filling small bags with a few pieces of candy and lining them up on the front steps or driveway. These Halloween goodie bags mean you can stay inside the house and trick-or-treaters avoid the germs that come with rifling through a communal bowl.

Get creative

Have extra string lying around? Create a zipline – perfect for transporting contact-free confections – from your front door to the sidewalk. Or, if you love a good engineering challenge, encourage neighbors to a friendly competition to see who can build the most creative system for delivering candy.

Put out hand sanitizer

If accessible, place a hand sanitizer bottle with a pump-top outside to encourage neighbors to clean their hands in passing.

If your house won’t be participating in trick or treating this year, you can still enjoy the holiday by:

•      Decorating the house’s exterior with creepy, crawly and festive décor.

•     Carving or painting pumpkins.

•      Watching scary movies.

•      Enjoying Halloween treats, like pudding “dirt” cups, candy corn and, of course, your favorite pieces of candy.

Written by RE/MAX News

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